How Does The Law Of Energy Conservation Jive With The Decline Of Available Energy Called Entropy?

I talk a lot in my articles about entropy, dutifully and masterfully explained by Nobel Prize physicist Richard Feynman, who describes that energy availability is always in decline. Thus came the poignant question, how does the reduction of available energy jive with the first law of thermodynamics, the law of energy conservation, stating the energy in a closed system is always constant?

The total energy in the universe (not quite what I would describe as a system, for we do not know the theory that precedes it) is presumed to be zero, as explained by renowned theoretical physicist and cosmologist Lawrence Krauss.

The start of our universe began with the Big Bang, whereby an organized state converts into an unorganized state, a process in many forms of relativity still happening all around us. That process of asymmetry does not eliminate energy. It converts energy from one form to another. Some of that energy is transformed from a state that is available to humans to one that is not. The energy is ultimately converted to dark matter and dark energy, making it unavailable to humans, while the total amount of energy remains the same.

Nature’s entropy obliterates the presumption of sustainability conjured up by ignorant humans in power. In fact, sustainability is incompatible with nature, and thus should be eliminated as a principle guiding today’s arbitrage of finance that determines the excellence of humanity.

The quest for the longevity of the human species is to adapt to nature’s entropy, a process that can only be supported by renewal. The kind of renewal that allows us to do more with less energy available to us.

Let’s lead the world by example with new rigors of excellence we first and successfully apply to ourselves.

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