Humanity’s One-Hundred-Year-Old Challenge

Georges van Hoegaerden

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Human life, like all life on planet earth, is fraught with life-threatening challenges. Many of those challenges originating in causes beyond human purview and control, forcing humanity to either adapt or gradually succumb to its consequences. 

The biggest and highest-order challenge not often talked about is nature’s entropy. A phenomenon described succinctly by Nobel Prize winner Richard Feynman as the irreversible decline of available energy from the fallout of the Big Bang Explosion, and the source of unrelenting change and finite existence of everything in our universe, our planet, and the evolution of humanity.

Compared to other major species, humanity is uniquely positioned to deal with the slow yet unrelenting roll of nature’s entropy. For humans are equipped with extraordinary intelligence by which a pattern-seeking species can discover the rules of nature’s gameplan, predict the future, and develop in accordance with nature’s guiding principles. 

And yet, humanity has done the opposite. More than one-hundred years after Albert Einstein discovered (almost) everything in our universe to revolve around the theory of general relativity, humanity has yet to apply the theory of relativity to itself. 

A grandiose missed opportunity, as, in Einstein’s words, the theory determines what can be discovered. For at least one-hundred years humanity has deployed foregone and unquestionable theories of ballooning solipsism incompatible with nature’s gameplay, and it shows.

By rejecting to continually reinvent itself along with the constitutions of its own making, humanity has caused severe damage to itself, and the environment it depends on for survival. Unchanged, the vector of human expansion will diverge even further from nature’s vector, resulting in the compounding detriment of an anthropogenic cascade and, eventually, self-induced human extinction.

Humanity can and must normalize itself against the latest and highest-order truths of nature to improve its adaptability to nature’s entropy and prolong the survival of the human race. 

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