Isn’t The U.S. Better Off Than Years Ago?

A reader on LinkedIn commented on my recent article about the validity of our democracy, with its innuendo as the title of this post I countered all-too-many times before. Here is my exchange to serve others who ponder the same, the questioner posits:

To compare where the US is now, it would be better to show how the stats compare to the past.  Listing a single point in time is unhelpful and uninformative.  Other than obesity I suspect most of those data points have been far worse in the past. [lightly edited for grammar and readability]

Here is my response:

Not quite, what has gotten worse is our emphasis on, and obsession with our individual sustainability which is actually erosive to the renewal of our species. I would have hoped you got that from reading the article carefully.

The theory determines what can be discovered, and if the discovery of those deplorable and inequitable outcomes is not a wakeup call to us, we will not address the change to the system that induces it.

Since we have sold the rest of the world a bill of goods that doesn’t even work well for us here in the U.S., I feel a solemn obligation to inspire the world with new systems we deploy first and successfully to ourselves.

We must lead by example, not with the pillage and plunder of more superlative vile maxims, but with systems that emphasize, exploit, and enable the value of human differences to maximize the fractal of humanity along a much needed dynamic equilibrium with nature.

And I’ll add for further consideration; take a look at any historical video of people walking the streets in the U.S. and you will notice how in shape they are compared to now.

If you ever wonder why a healthcare system we try to conjure up as we ignore the responsibility to our own health is simply unsustainable, you begin to uncover the real reason why our other manmade systems do not produce human excellence either, and that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

 

 

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