Why Does India Not Abandon Socialism Even If The Poverty Rate Is Alarming? Why Are They Not Accepting Free Market And Capitalism?

Georges van Hoegaerden

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Socialism is a symptom, not a system (or I will challenge you to name its guiding rules); a symptom omnipresent in even the colluding oligarchy of capitalism. Capitalism, the way we deploy it in the U.S., built on a stale totalitarian monism of freedom, quite the opposite of freedom for all.

The U.S., as the most vocal proponent and prominent purveyor of capitalism, now has a financial system eleven times the size of production, with 15.8% extreme poverty and 25% of children in public schools on lunch aid. So, the point is, be careful what you wish for. Neanderthal capitalism, as the alternative to whatever you choose to name yours, has proven to yield undesirable division and stifling mobility tied to artificial type-casting of people, albeit our oligarchy scores well on the world’s leaderboard of nebulous GDP riches.

Keep in mind, the success of a country is not based on the absolutism of its report card but the strength of the renewal of its people in symbiosis with nature. GDP is the wrong measuring stick of success and does nothing for human evolution. GDP is as irrelevant as the final score in soccer is not at all an indicator of the quality of gameplay if you catch my drift.

All systems in violation of the fundamental principles of a plurality of freedom are bound to fail spectacularly. Hence, we must subjugate capitalism to more modern principles of freedom capable of encompassing all of humanity.

Our manmade systems need an overhaul, as I have explained ad nauseam. Capitalism must be made to subjugate to real freedom, a plurality of freedom to each his own that spawns a dynamic meritocracy in constant renewal along the expanding fractal of human discovery, ingenuity, and capacity.

But there are good reasons to eliminate the symptoms of socialism from any system, for socialism makes it very difficult to find and breed outliers who change the world for the better.

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