Internet Privacy: When Russian Courts Make More Sense Than American

We, in the beautiful U.S. of A, have a real problem with freedom. Proclaimed as the hallmark of our economic excellence, we misappropriate freedom and without the delicacy of respect commensurate with such distinction. What gives?

  • First, we mention freedom in our constitution, but never quite define what constitutes freedom. As witnessed not solely by the somewhat clueless answers given to that very question asked of members of Congress, let alone the U.S. population.
  • Second, we believe in the validity of freedom’s unsigned promissory note. As in unchecked freedom, we are magically providing real value to society, instead of spawning a vile-maxim of freedom that destroys freedom for the less selfish.
  • Third, we have defined but a stale monism of freedom. The freedom that benefits those who are willing and able to submit to its oligarchic implementation and even more cunning circumvention. Like Apple leadership dodging the bullet on its unacceptable stance concerning iMessage privacy.

It is telling when Russia as perhaps one of the most rogue nations in the world (or is it, with 50% of credit-card fraud in the world coming from the U.S.) and perhaps induced for nefarious government reasons must show us how to deal with the criminal attempts to destroy the protection of collective freedom for us all.

Russia just put the smackdown on the blatant overreach of technology companies to own and control the world. And for this move, their court decision deserves my utmost respect.

I warned technology companies a long time ago: govern thyselves or be governed, tap into my advisory to save yourselves from rejection, embarrassment, and ultimately, demise.

 

Let’s lead the world by example with new rigors of excellence we first and successfully apply to ourselves.

Subscribe | Donate | Zoom | Follow:

Click to access the login or register cheese