Does Europe Have A Chance To Become The World’s First Transnational Democracy?

No. Not by any chance by what goes on today. But Eurozone leaders do a decent job of holding up make-believe.

First, Europe is already divided in Eurozone and non-Eurozone states. Second, both the Dutch and French voted against the initial constitution of the Eurozone, its governments subsequently refusing to call a new public referendum on eventually joining nevertheless. Quite antidemocratic. The United Kingdom, first coming to that realization wisely opted out. Indeed, in the words of Nigel Farage, there is nothing democratic about the Eurozone, which today comprises much of Europe. The Eurozone today is ruled by unelected officials, with its citizen’s lulled, enslaved, and enamored by its Stockholm syndrome. The Eurozone is on the wrong side of evolution, its previous cultural plurality destroyed by unification, a better sounding descriptor for subpriming.

The higher-order issue here, however, is that no democracy not subjugated to a plurality of freedom will be renewable, meaning the value of a democracy erodes quickly after a vote on anything is cast. Even if a public referendum were to be held across the eligible states of the Eurozone in the fervor of democracy, the lack of plurality of freedom of its constitution would prevent a dynamic meritocracy from constantly renewing said democracy by the wish of its people. And a democracy that does not renew itself constantly turns into a stifling, stale, and narrowing oligarchy. One of the reasons why the Chinese do not follow the “holy grail” of our ill-fated implementation of democracy, not even the one we champion here in the U.S.

We must build better operating-systems for humanity (I have ) if we wish the implementation of democracy to continually explore and expand what its people can discover.

Let’s lead the world by example with new rigors of excellence we first and successfully apply to ourselves.

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