Why Is It That When We Grow Up, We Find Out That Everything We Thought And Were Taught Was A Lie?

Not everything is a lie, but a lot. In the words of the fantastic comedian and actor, John Cleese, creator of Fawlty Towers and Monty Python:

Nobody really knows what they are talking about. — John Cleese

Humanity is prone to hold on to some serious hallucinations. The main reason for that is we as humans have a burning desire to define things in a realm of absolutism, stale, and frozen in time. That way, we can feel in control of the way things used to be, and convey the mastery of a subject to everyone we aim to control. Examples abound.

Reality is, the world is a speck in a universe full of relativity, in which our continual discoveries of the relativity of truth challenge the manmade theories of absolutism set before us. Not in the least influenced by the relativity of mankind itself, an innate evolutionary meritocracy aiming to be held hostage by the conflicting manmade systems of absolutism and induced by consensus, as ill-formed such compliant consensus so often is.

No more is the shallow normalization of truth more apparent than when a young child with budding wherewithal keeps asking the infamous question; why? As a parent, you are painfully aware of how quickly we all run out of reasonable answers when a child begins to climb that ladder towards your best interpretation of truth. Why is the sky blue?

Your best contribution to society is to question everything. And use your skeptical thought-process to attempt to come up with a better normalization of truth, especially when the majority of people and its domain experts run out of answers. Because when you find a better normalization of truth is where real innovation without precedent can be born. The kind of innovation that is responsible for strengthening the renewal of humanity and improving the longevity of the human species.

Consider yourself blessed. You noticed the lies (many don’t). Now act on your discoveries with a better normalization of truth. You are one-third on the way. And when you get to two-thirds, I, for one, want to hear from you.

 

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