Are Extreme Differences In Wealth, Income, And Political Power An Inevitable Consequence Of A Free-market Economy?

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No, precisely the opposite. But since we currently do not have marketplaces to act in conformance to any meaningful measure of freedom, and driven by stale assignments of merit, those marketplaces turn into narrow absolutisms controlled by an increasingly unchallenged oligarchy of self-interests.

Hence the bell-curve of merit in our current marketplaces, in blatant disregard to the freedom of freedom, turns steep and narrow and becomes increasingly resistant to the reinvention of renewability.

“None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free”

Goethe

Simply put, we fundamentally lie about our freedom. And hence we fail miserably in the pursuit of excellence of humanitarian interests.

That is not to suggest a better proxy of a free-market will eradicate all differences between the haves and have-nots – it won’t. But a relativity theory of freedom that respects and supports a pluralism of merit, assigned to evolutionary values, will produce a bell-curve of merit much more widely distributed, and assign merit to an ever-changing composition of performers.

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